Sophia Mazurek on
The Perfect Self

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Can we agree that there is no such thing as perfection?

We use the word often: "That is a Perfect Sunset," "That painting is perfect." "I want the Perfect Partner" or "the Perfect Job." Maybe you have, are searching for or want "that Perfect House" or wish you had "the Perfect Child?" Is it possible that you wish "You could BE perfect?"

Put that thought aside for a moment...

Let's talk about the most perfect expression that exists on this planet -Nature.  Remember that sunset? What about flowers in bloom or that water view? Sunsets end, Flowers die. Water has taken many lives. In its perfection, nature is riddled with fault. But, is it really riddled with  fault, or is that occurrence simple "a way that is?"

Watching birds as they soar in the sky, catching a ride on the thermals is one of the most calming and majestic sights. One is forced to take a deep breath and sigh...

The curious part about birds is how they are so very different: in size,  manner, colour, nature, purpose, as a species - within a species - but all just... fly. They even eat along side each other in spite of the fact that some are carnivorous, frugivorous, granivores, insectivorous; some prefer one type of food, others will eat absolutely anything.

Don't like birds?

Ever seen a litter of pups in the wild as they tussle with each other in joyful play? They leap and swat and nibble and roll  while mother and father hover close by, fawning and fussing like any human parents would fawn and fuss over their children.

The "fault?" Ever see an omnivore bird snatch a nestling from its nest? Not a pretty sight - or sound as the predator bird flies off to feed its own baby with a mob of birds in pursuit.

Those cute pups? They kill to eat. Don't think you want to distinguish between breeds - or witness their prey as they attack.

 

The point is, in Nature's perfection, it is imperfect. We humans are (one of the) biggest game in nature. We are incredible in our genius but brutal in our imperfections.

That just is.

When examining all that we tout about perfection, can we concede to being a part of nature which includes the complexities that are hard to witness? Like the flowers, waters, birds and pups can we be in awe of ourselves, knowing we exist to our best with "faults?" Can we concede that there is no such thing as perfection while appreciating the perfection of imperfection, particularly when it comes to the most incredible part of nature that is us?

If you want to reach this understanding but need help getting there, reach out.

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